Revisiting the Historic Moment of Jack Ruby’s Live TV Shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald: An In-Depth Look

On November 24, 1963, two days after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, the man accused of killing Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald, was being transferred from the city jail to the county jail. As Oswald was being led through the basement of the Dallas police headquarters, Jack Ruby, a Dallas nightclub owner, stepped out from a crowd of reporters and fired a single shot from a concealed .38 caliber revolver, hitting Oswald in the abdomen. Oswald was rushed to the hospital, but he died a short time later.

Ruby’s shooting of Oswald was witnessed by a number of people, including reporters, police officers, and photographers, and was captured on film by a number of news cameras that were present at the police headquarters. The shooting was broadcast on live television and was seen by millions of people around the world.

Ruby was quickly arrested and charged with murder. He was found guilty and sentenced to death, but the conviction was later overturned on appeal. He was retried and again found guilty, but he died of lung cancer in 1967 while his appeal was still pending.


born on October 06, 1924

Louis Jolyon West

American psychiatrist involved in the public sphere

born on March 25, 1911 (d. 1967)

Jack Ruby

American nightclub owner Who shot Lee Harvey Oswald

Ruby’s psychiatrist was Louis Jolyon West who fought to have Ruby declared insane (and therefore prevent people from listening to him) even though everybody thought Ruby to be perfectly fine.


born on October 18, 1939 (d. 1963)

Lee Harvey Oswald

Marine veteran who assassinated John F. Kennedy

born on March 25, 1911 (d. 1967)

Jack Ruby

American nightclub owner Who shot Lee Harvey Oswald

People featured in this post:


Lee Harvey Oswald

Marine veteran who assassinated John F. Kennedy


Louis Jolyon West

American psychiatrist involved in the public sphere


Jack Ruby

American nightclub owner Who shot Lee Harvey Oswald

When Death Took a Holiday…

Nobody dies while Death makes love.

In 1865, Death took a holiday, and since then, dozens of death-based psyops have been created to hoodwink real criminals. These psyops are rather complex, but the actors have worked diligently to help us discover their missions in the public record.

Rule #1: Assemble events

People who have multiple identities will often accomplish under both identities at the same time.

Rule #2: Why change one’s birthday?

Often, people who play multiple roles do not change their birthdays, so we may find them by exploring people born at the same time.

The people who are most active under multiple identities in the 19th century are visual artists and painters. Queen Victoria was famously almost assassinated by a painter by the name of Edward Oxford.


born on April 18, 1822

Edward Oxford

First of seven people who tried to assassinate Queen Victoria

born on May 24, 1819 (d. 1901)

Queen Victoria

Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1837–1901)

EVENT CARD

Edward Oxford fires two pistols at the Royal Carriage in an attempt to assasinate Queen Victoria
It happened on 10 June, 1840

Featuring: Edward Oxford, Albert, Prince Consort, Queen Victoria.

In 1865, an actor performed the role of killing Abraham Lincoln.


born on May 10, 1838 (d. 1865)

John Wilkes Booth

American stage actor who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C., on April 14, 1865

born on February 12, 1809 (d. 1865)

Abraham Lincoln

16th President of The United States

 

Some Great Vacations for Death…

PERSON CARD

Ian Brady   born on January 2, 1938.

Serial Killer (The Moors murders) between July 1963 and October 1965

Ian Brady is a serial killer credited for the Moors murders with his wife Myra, between July 1963 and October 1965. For twenty years after, the Bradys would confess to murders which would lead the Manchester police to investigate and search for human remains. Alternate Identity People who play multiple roles in our reality will coordinate their accomplishments in order to become detectable to the future. One day, we will realize that "